the first waltz: a historical photoblog




Portrait of Eleonora (Dianora) di Don Garzia di Toledo di Pietro de’ Medici

~Alessandro Allori 

c. 1571

Oil on panel 

114.5 x 89.5 cm

Kunsthistorisches Museum of Vienna, Austria* , Vienna, Wien state, Austria
Aug 19

Portrait of Eleonora (Dianora) di Don Garzia di Toledo di Pietro de’ Medici
~Alessandro Allori 
c. 1571
Oil on panel 
114.5 x 89.5 cm
Kunsthistorisches Museum of Vienna, Austria* , Vienna, Wien state, Austria

(Source: fuckyeahrenaissanceart, via hectograph)

duchakaladydiana:

Duchakaladydiana’s 1st Birthday Celebration Spam: 100 Pictures of Diana Spam 80/100
Aug 19

duchakaladydiana:

Duchakaladydiana’s 1st Birthday Celebration Spam: 100 Pictures of Diana Spam 80/100

heavyarethecrowns:

Personal Collection of Queen Elizabeth II
Princess Andrew of Greece’s Meander Tiara
Also known as the Greek Key tiara, the tiara was a wedding gift to then Princess Elizabeth from her mother-in-law Princess Andrew of Greece and Denmark (born Princess Alice of Battenberg) 
The Queen has never worn this item in public and it was given to Princess Anne around 1972. Princess Anne has frequently worn the tiara in public, notably during her engagement photo to Mark Phillips and an official portrait for her 50th birthday. 
In 2011 Princess Anne lent the tiara to her daughter Zara Phillips for her wedding to Mike Tindall 
Aug 19

heavyarethecrowns:

Personal Collection of Queen Elizabeth II

Princess Andrew of Greece’s Meander Tiara

Also known as the Greek Key tiara, the tiara was a wedding gift to then Princess Elizabeth from her mother-in-law Princess Andrew of Greece and Denmark (born Princess Alice of Battenberg) 

The Queen has never worn this item in public and it was given to Princess Anne around 1972. Princess Anne has frequently worn the tiara in public, notably during her engagement photo to Mark Phillips and an official portrait for her 50th birthday. 

In 2011 Princess Anne lent the tiara to her daughter Zara Phillips for her wedding to Mike Tindall 

(via theladyintweed)

Aug 19

bulletproofjewels:

text posts + the romanovs

(via withgodshelp)


The Duke of York (later King George VI) and his daughter Princess Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth II) 
Aug 19

The Duke of York (later King George VI) and his daughter Princess Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth II) 

(Source: thoseroyalss, via royallymonroe)

Aug 18

ladies who should be playing mythical head bitches in charge | ROSE BYRNE as ISABELLA OF FRANCE, the wife of edward ii and mother of edward iii, renowned for her beauty and political finesse, who deposed her husband and was named the she-wolf of france.

Hugh Despenser hangs from a great height with his entrails falling out, and his cries can be heard for miles. She touches her handkerchief to her nose, to block out the stench of burning flesh, but also to hide her smile. I am a queen, she thinks and tilts her head. I come from the royal blood of France, I am a queen and my mother was a queen and I am made from the flesh of conquerors. Kings may love and kings may forget - as the world allows them these trivial delights - but queens must always have the crown in mind, lest they become mere puppets. Queens must always have a taste for blood. She touches her tongue to her teeth, and thinks, burn.

(via edwardslovelyelizabeth)

sarahbellar:

Queen Silvia 
Aug 18

sarahbellar:

Queen Silvia 

(via royaltyspeaking)

cupsofsilver:

Rib Cage damage due to a corset in the 19th century London Fashion. 
Aug 14

cupsofsilver:

Rib Cage damage due to a corset in the 19th century London Fashion. 

(via kuntessa)

Aug 11

catalinadetrastamara:

Women in History:

Christine de Pizan (1364 – c. 1430)

She was an Italian French late medieval author. She served as a court writer for several dukes (Louis of Orleans, Philip the Bold of Burgundy, and John the Fearless of Burgundy) and the French royal court during the reign of Charles VI. As a poet, she was well known and highly regarded in her own day; she completed 41 works during her 30-year career, and can be regarded as Europe’s first professional woman writer. She married in 1380, at the age of 15, and was widowed 10 years later. Much of the impetus for her writing came from her need to earn a living for herself and her three children. She spent most of her childhood and all of her adult life in Paris and then the abbey at Poissy, and wrote entirely in her adoptive tongue of Middle French.

Her early courtly poetry is marked by her knowledge of aristocratic custom and fashion of the day, particularly involving women and the practice of chivalry. Her early and later allegorical and didactic treatises reflect both autobiographical information about her life and views and also her own individualized and humanist approach to the scholastic learned tradition of mythology, legend, and history she inherited from clerical scholars and to the genres and courtly or scholastic subjects of contemporary French and Italian poets she admired. Supported and encouraged by important royal French and English patrons, she influenced 15th-century English poetry. Her success stems from a wide range of innovative writing and rhetorical techniques that critically challenged renowned writers such as Jean de Meun, author of the “Romance of the Rose”, which work she criticized as immoral.

In recent decades, de Pizan’s work has been returned to prominence by the efforts of scholars such as Charity Cannon Willard, Earl Jeffrey Richards and Simone de Beauvoir. Certain scholars have argued that she should be seen as an early feminist who efficiently used language to convey that women could play an important role within society. This characterization has been challenged by other critics, who claim that it is either an anachronistic use of the word or a misinterpretation of Pizan’s writing and intentions.

(via daughter-of-castile)